[Greenbuilding] Ventilation for Unoccupied Tight Buildings

Alan Abrams alan at abramsdesignbuild.com
Sun Aug 24 08:25:28 MDT 2014


It raises the question of whether HP buildings in mixed humid climates need
bi-directionally permeable walls and roofs. A bi-directionally drying wall
would be like one of Ken Levenson's assemblies, with various arrangements
of vented drainage planes, smart membranes, and permeable insulation and
sheathing. see:

http://foursevenfive.com/knowledge-resources/construction-details/

An example of the opposite case, in which interior moisture must dry to the
interior is the NIST Net Zero Energy Test House, with a double layer of
foil faced polyisocyanurate over conventionally framed and insulated walls.

-AA

Alan Abrams

*certified professional building designer, AIBD certified passive house
consultant, PHIUS*
*certified passive house builder, PHIUS*
Abrams Design Build LLC
*sustainable design for intentional living*
cell     202-437-8583
alan at abramsdesignbuild.com
www.abramsdesignbuild.com


On Sun, Aug 24, 2014 at 10:06 AM, Clarke Olsen <colsen at fairpoint.net> wrote:

> It seems intuitive to leave some windows open, and let the building
> breath, dare I say it, naturally.
>     Clarke Olsen
> clarkeolsendesign.com
> 373 route 203
> Spencertown, NY 12165
> USA
> 518-392-4640
> colsen at taconic.net
>
>
>
>
> On Aug 24, 2014, at 8:33 AM, "conservation architect" <
> elitalking at rockbridge.net> wrote:
>
>  I have learned of some problems with college dormitories of a Passiv
> Haus building that was left unoccupied with not conditioned or ventilated
> with ERV over the summer and got some molding problems.  I am wanting to
> inquire about what the best practices are for unoccupied tight buildings.
> Since they are unoccupied, I would hope you could turn the energy consuming
> machines off.  The humidity sources within the would be reduced,
> (breathing, cooking, bathing, et.).  Although you would still have ambient
> humidity and standing water of toilets.  Perhaps it would be a good
> practice to drain the toilets.  This issue would be more significant in the
> Summer of high ambient humidity.  I live in the mixed climate of Virginia.
> However, I would be interested in comments as it relates to other
> climates.  My question applies to tight buildings that have active
> dehumidification (ac or dehumidifier) and ERV, or no active
> dehumidification and HRV.   Eli
> _______________________________________________
> Greenbuilding mailing list
> to Send a Message to the list, use the email address
> Greenbuilding at bioenergylists.org
>
> to UNSUBSCRIBE or Change your List Settings use the web page
>
> http://lists.bioenergylists.org/mailman/listinfo/greenbuilding_lists.bioenergylists.org
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Greenbuilding mailing list
> to Send a Message to the list, use the email address
> Greenbuilding at bioenergylists.org
>
> to UNSUBSCRIBE or Change your List Settings use the web page
>
> http://lists.bioenergylists.org/mailman/listinfo/greenbuilding_lists.bioenergylists.org
>
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: <http://lists.bioenergylists.org/pipermail/greenbuilding_lists.bioenergylists.org/attachments/20140824/8684e62b/attachment.html>


More information about the Greenbuilding mailing list