[Stoves] Jatropha and its future

Fireside Hearth firesidehearthvashon at hotmail.com
Sun Aug 7 21:19:48 PDT 2011


    Thank you Crispin....

             These are all great ideas! Do you have any gut level sense of what downsides there could be with regard to emission? would I find these to be "fairly clean" fuel options? The glycerine did produce a scent/smoke free burn once temperatures got high enough, however getting there was both smelly and irritating. My delivery system I believe will need to advance to (possibly) a fuel injector, unless something less complicated (oil drip) can be thought up with any reliability. I actually started this project as a pellet stove with a simple 12 volt auger and timing block system. I could go back to that to push grains, seeds, or pitts....even dung! The electrical demand would be covered by solar, and at some time I wish to experiment further with thermocoupling the stove for a truly off grid, self powered pellet stove. I am saving these posts which get me thinking so once my current project is underway I can revisit them. With the level of expertise represented here many  things are exciting possibilities......this is one e-mail I will save for the near future and look for more information on as I develop new ideas. Thank you very much.
Roger  

From: crispinpigott at gmail.com
To: stoves at lists.bioenergylists.org
Date: Sun, 7 Aug 2011 23:40:34 -0400
Subject: Re: [Stoves] Jatropha and its future



Dear Roger Alex English can comment on the corn burning, but I think it is from ash melting that you get the clinkering. Sugar burns really well at a low temperature. With all crops, there are many tons that are spoiled for various reasons. Therefore there is always a market for them. Aflatoxin (and zearalanone) contamination is a problem in some countries and it would be good if it were burned rather than fed to slightly more tolerant animals. That stuff is bad news.  Mouldy maize is usually mixed with good maize to meet some local standard but still, there is a lot that can’t be used for food or feed. So, into the fire. Rancid grains, rotten wheat, mouldy oats – we should turn them into fuel as it is biomass and already pelletized! The advantage of using glycerine is that it doesn’t spill well and kids are unlikely to drink it. Like gelled alcohol, it melts at just the right temperature and could me a good fuel. Could you get a smell-less burn? That would be an indication the burn was good for a start. There is a wax burning stove developed in South Africa and Sasol (Sasolwax in an earlier name) was interested in it generally, and developing their own stove commercially, which I have never seen in the wild. There is a lot of leftover wax from various industrial processes, just as there are many alcohols left over from sugar making – like 100 types! Into the fire! RegardsCrispin  ++++Interesting idea........Are the any records kept on how cleanly and or how much maintenance might be involved. Example.....corn feed stoves have allot of klinkering due to the sugar content if I understand correctly. We might be able to utilize more of these fuels than I realize at this point as I have not had enough time to test these things out. Our focus has had to stay more narrow than I would like due to the "business side" of our growth. I did for a while mess with burning Glycerine from bio diesel manufacturing. Althoe I have not dismissed this avenue I do feel it is a messy process. The glycerine heats up and "melts" much like paraffin wax and could become a fire hazard. I am interested as I am coming to a point of less business and more inventing to try alternative fuel sources......any ideas???
Thank you R&B  From: crispinpigott at gmail.com
To: stoves at lists.bioenergylists.org
Date: Sun, 7 Aug 2011 14:36:59 -0400
Subject: [Stoves] Jatropha and its futureDear FriendsI am not sure how many stove are being worked on as Jatropha seed or oil or cake burners, but my understanding was the main thrust was to put to use some of the leftovers from biofuel production, especially that was the focus in Tanzania.It seems those farmers who invested in Jatropha production lost about $65 per ha http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/es201943v so my question is whether or not there is much point in working on (perhaps) whole seed stoves. Perhaps if the J-oil industry suffers a quick death there will still be a meaningful supply of oily seed fuel that  can be burned relatively easily with a decent performance and controllability. At least until they go back to sunflower which looks a lot more promising.Has anyone made a sunflower seed burning stove? The oil runs up to 49% on some varieties.Always looking for new ideas…RegardsCrispin  
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