[Stoves] Jatropha and its future

Jan Bianchi janbianchi at comcast.net
Mon Aug 8 08:08:37 PDT 2011


Jet City StoveWorks is currently conducting kitchen tests of the jatropha seed stove Marc refers to in Tanzania.

  Jatropha grows wild throughout the tropics as well as recently as biodiesel  crop there. Alternatively, and more productively,  it can be grown as a hedge around land holdings so it need not displace land for food production.  That produces enough seed to fuel the family cookstove for a year as well as have some left over to sell into the Jatropha market. It costs at least four times less than a comparable burn time for wood and six times less than charcoal.

We are continuing CO and PM testing and hope to have our test results online by next month.  We had a stove at Aprovecho's stove camp couple of weeks ago and will have one at Paul Anderson's TLUD camp in MA in August. 
Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 8, 2011, at 2:10 AM, Marc Pare <mpare at gatech.edu> wrote:

> Crispin, re exisiting Jatropha stoves:
> 
> There was this one at ETHOS this year by J. Otto and friends:
> http://www.vrac.iastate.edu/ethos/proceedings2011/OttoOttoCovert_JatrophaSeedCookingStoveDevelopmentPromotion.pdf
> and a quick picture of it running outside in Kirkland:
> http://smallredtile.tumblr.com/post/3246717546/marc-in-the-wild-there-were-many-arguments-about
> 
> It burns whole seeds in a natural draft TLUD. Draft is augmented by an inner air pipe (lots of pictures of the assembly in the ETHOS presentation)
> 
> Marc Paré
> B.S. Mechanical Engineering
> Georgia Institute of Technology | Université de Technologie de Compiègne
> 
> my cv, etc. | http://notwandering.com
> 
> 
> On Mon, Aug 8, 2011 at 1:36 AM, Crispin Pemberton-Pigott <crispinpigott at gmail.com> wrote:
> Dear Friends
> 
> I am not sure how many stove are being worked on as Jatropha seed or oil or cake burners, but my understanding was the main thrust was to put to use some of the leftovers from biofuel production, especially that was the focus in Tanzania.
> 
> It seems those farmers who invested in Jatropha production lost about $65 per ha http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/es201943v so my question is whether or not there is much point in working on (perhaps) whole seed stoves. Perhaps if the J-oil industry suffers a quick death there will still be a meaningful supply of oily seed fuel that  can be burned relatively easily with a decent performance and controllability. At least until they go back to sunflower which looks a lot more promising.
> 
> Has anyone made a sunflower seed burning stove? The oil runs up to 49% on some varieties.
> 
> Always looking for new ideas…
> 
> Regards
> 
> Crispin
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
> 
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