[Stoves] Fuel production, biochar, and feeding the stove in 2040

George Riegg Gambia icecool at qanet.gm
Wed Aug 24 05:11:27 PDT 2011


The gospel from the jungle....
just out of curiosity to my learned friends here

I was part of a workshop with nursery school teachers about environmental 
issues and one of the sessions dealt with the benefits of trees in our lives 
and communities. Compiling a list one teacher said that our traditional 
"bantas" (metting place/time) are held under the village tree (usually a 
massive old Baobab, Silk Cotton or Mango) and this is done because holding 
it there benefits the tree - his argument was that so many people (anything 
up to 25 or 30) give up so much carbon feeding the tree and the tree pays 
back by providing the "better air" as he puts it.... this is also why these 
trees are so healthy....

Being the kind of over-educated cynical guy I am I reserved my comment and 
judgement for another day.... now I wonder.....

George form the jungle

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Anand Karve" <adkarve at gmail.com>
To: "Discussion of biomass cooking stoves" <stoves at lists.bioenergylists.org>
Sent: Wednesday, August 24, 2011 3:42 AM
Subject: Re: [Stoves] Fuel production, biochar, and feeding the stove in 
2040


Dear Crispin,
that plants grow faster with supply of air containing higher amounts
of carbon dioxide is a well known phenomenon. In fact, it is one of
the factors contributing to higher yield in greenhouses. In peninsular
India we grow crops throughout the year. They need neither artificial
heating nor cooling. Our Institute therefore developed the concept of
a topless greenhouse, which consists of just a skirting of plastic
film around plots of 10m X 10m size.  Carbon dioxide is about 1.5
times as heavy as ordinary air. Therefore when plants breath out
carbon dioxide in the night, the field plots surrounded by the plastic
skirting act as tanks which store the carbon dioxide. In the morning,
when the sun rises, the plants utilize this carbon dioxide in the
process of photosynthesis. Because of the higher concentration of
carbon dioxide in the air, the rate of photosynthesis is higher.
Although this concept has not yet been accepted by the science
establishment, a lot of farmers have started using it to raise high
value crops like coloured capsicum and flowers. We have not patented
this technology. Anybody can use it.
Yours
A.D.Karve

On Wed, Aug 24, 2011 at 12:24 AM, Crispin Pemberton-Pigott
<crispinpigott at gmail.com> wrote:
> Dear Friends
>
> I am posting this to the stoves group but it also concerns biochar from 
> two
> processes, pyrogenic char and hydrochar. The former is what stoves 
> produce.
>
> It confirms that biomass (trees and grasses) grow significantly faster 
> (10%)
> under estimated CO2 concentrations for the year 2040. This is confirmation
> of other work that agricultural production which increased since 1950 is
> partly attributable to increased CO2.
>
> It means that within a generation, the management of woodlots for stove
> fuels will be easier, and the area needed per family, smaller.
>
> Regards
>
> Crispin
>
> From
> http://www.licor.com/env/newsline/2011/05/studies-in-german-grasslands-reveal-the-effects-of-climate-change/?utm_source=Newsline&utm_medium=email&utm_content=grasslands&utm_campaign=aug_2011&mkt_tok=3RkMMJWWfF9wsRolvq%2FNZKXonjHpfsX96O4qXrHr08Yy0EZ5VunJEUWy2YoGRdQhcOuuEwcWGog8zAVbFfI%3D
>
> Grasses were grown at elevated CO2 levels.
>
> “Scientists observed a 10% increase in carbon sequestration in biomass but
> no increase in the carbon content in the soil.”
>
> “A new experiment is underway in which scientists seek to determine if and
> how biochar, synthesized by pyrolysis of biomass, can be used for 
> long-term
> carbon sequestration in soils and, as a benefit, increase soil fertility.
> They are using this experiment to evaluate the effects of two different
> chars, a pyrogenic biochar and a hydrochar produced via hydrothermal
> carbonization, their common feedstock (Miscanthus) as well as a “no
> addition” control. They are interested in the impact and fate of biochar 
> and
> hydrochar with respect to N2O and CO2 emissions, plant growth, and carbon
> sequestration.”
>
>
>
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>



-- 
***
Dr. A.D. Karve
President, Appropriate Rural Technology Institute (ARTI)

*Please change my email address in your records to: adkarve at gmail.com *

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